Good for You + Good for the Planet
Fork in the Road > Recipes > Cuisine Inspiration > America > Pluot Brown Sugar Buckwheat Pancakes

Pluot Brown Sugar Buckwheat Pancakes

Pluot Brown Sugar Buckwheat Pancakes, a fluffy and healthy gluten-free hotcakes recipe using buckwheat flour, brown sugar, and fresh seasonal pluots. The perfect hearty brunch hotcakes recipe!

Pluot brown sugar buckwheat pancakes on a white plate being cut with a fork.

If you’re like me, you love breakfast. As foodies most of us could never choose a favorite eating occasion (we love them all) but breakfast is near and dear to our heart…and not only because there is usually coffee involved (but that too).

From sweet pancakes to savory potatoes to good old fashion oats and a cup of joe, the decisions are endless. If someone asked me to choose between sweet or savory breakfast for the rest of my life I could never do it, it’s hard enough for me to decide when sitting down to Sunday brunch.

Pluot brown sugar buckwheat pancakes stacked on a white plate on a white table.

One thing I’ve realized after years on the road is the strength of American breakfast culture. Many people say that Americans do not have an eating culture, but to this I say–um, hello, let me introduce you to breakfast.

As an adventurous eater, I don’t have a problem assimilating to a culture’s meal patterns when traveling, but my ‘American-ness’ really shows when it comes to the first meal of the day. I spent a month in Asia a few years ago and, try as I might, my body is physically unable to eat ramen or vegetable soup first thing in the morning.

Even when visiting my Francesco’s family in Italy, I have a hard time eating only croissants with Nutella every day for weeks on end. Um, can a girl get an egg?

One thing the husband and I can agree on for breakfast is pancakes. When we first married he was not so interested even though they fit his Italian preference for a sweets in the morning. But over time I’ve broken him down: he is now a master pancake maker and has them four or five mornings a week.

Let’s take a second and talk about pluots.

When I was studying to become a dietitian, I worked in a small German cafe that served an amazing streusel with pluots…but I have to admit I had no idea what a pluot was and had to go home and look it up to make sure I wasn’t crazy.

RELATED:  Kimchi Glazed Brussels Sprouts

Was it a plum? An apricot? Well, it’s actually both.

Pluots are a ‘crossbreed,’ or interspecific fruit, made from three fifths plum and two fifths apricot. The result is a reddish plum-like fruit with a firmer center than a traditional plum, but without the fuzzy outer skin of an apricot. Apparently there are also apriums, which are also a breed between the two fruits that have more apricot characteristics.

In addition there are also plumcots and apriplums, just to make it more confusing. Bottom line? They’re delicious and they are a great sweet addition to the hearty, earthy flavor of buckwheat pancakes.

Sliced pluots cooking in a black pan.

What is buckwheat and why should I use it in my pancakes?

Contrary to its name, buckwheat is not a form of wheat or grass but is actually considered a psuedocereal that is a cousin to sorrel and rhubarb. It is thought to have originated in Southeast Asia thousands of years ago, but spread throughout Central Asia and Europe and is now grown throughout the world. However, most of the world’s buckwheat cultivation now happens in China and Russia.

Buckwheat seeds produce a thick flour that is commonly used in Asian cuisines to produce thick noodles like soba. Pancakes made from buckwheat flour are favorites in Russia and Asia, in both sweet and savory forms. And here in the United States buckwheat is becoming increasingly more popular due to the popularity of gluten free baking alternatives, which makes these healthy buckwheat pancakes a great alternative to traditional flour hotcakes.

Pluot Brown Sugar Buckwheat Pancakes: Tips, Tricks & Tools

This post may contain affiliate links, which provide us a small commission from products purchased but are no extra cost to you. Please see our Privacy & Disclosure Statement for more details.

This Pluot Brown Sugar Buckwheat Pancakes recipe is a simple healthy and gluten free option and does not require extra equipment, however below are a few tricks and tools I have used and recommend.

  • Quality buckwheat flour: I’m a big proponent of sourcing the best quality and most environmentally friendly ingredients as possible (as travelers who love the earth, we have to do our part to save it!) so I always choose quality buckwheat flour when possible.
  • A great pancake pan: I always remember my father’s pancakes because they were big, fluffy and delicious. At the time I thought it was him and his special technique, but I later found out it’s because he had a great pancake pan (though his pancake skills are world reknowned). This Lava pancake and pizza pan is made of cast iron and is eco friendly (win, win!).
  • Quality maple syrup: If you’ve had good quality maple syrup, you know why I make it a priority.
RELATED:  Pineapple Pico de Gallo Avocado Cups

Pluot brown sugar buckwheat pancakes on a white plate being cut with a fork.


This Pluot Brown Sugar Buckwheat Pancakes recipe is one of our favorite seasonal brunch recipes! If you’re looking for more delicious and globally-inspired breakfast recipes make sure to try our Meyer Lemon Marscarpone Dutch Baby Cake recipe, the Southern-inspired Black Cherry Hoecakes, and our savory Saffron Chickpea Chard Hash with Sunny Egg.

Did you try this Pluot Brown Sugar Buckwheat Pancakes recipe? Leave a comment and rating below to share how it turned out, pin it to your favorite breakfast or brunch Pinterest board, and tag me on Instagram so I can see your pancake creations!


Print

Pluot Brown Sugar Buckwheat Pancakes

Pluot brown sugar buckwheat pancakes on a white plate being cut with a fork.

Pluot Brown Sugar Buckwheat Pancakes, a fluffy and healthy gluten-free hotcakes recipe using buckwheat flour, brown sugar, and fresh seasonal pluots. The perfect hearty brunch hotcakes recipe!

  • Author: Kristina Todini
  • Prep Time: 5 mins
  • Cook Time: 20 mins
  • Total Time: 25 minutes
  • Yield: 6 medium pancakes
  • Category: Breakfast

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Heat pan over medium-low heat using a little oil or butter.
  2. Add sliced pluot and cook until soft, about 4-5 minutes, flipping once. Set aside.
  3. Mix dry ingredients (buckwheat flour, baking powder, salt, baking soda) and then add egg, oil, vanilla, milk, and brown sugar. Stir until well blended.
  4. Lay 2-4 slices of cooked pluot on pan in small circle, then pour pancake batter over, covering. Cook pancake about 2-3 minutes on each side, or until batter is cooked through.
  5. After all pancakes are finished, stack cakes with remaining pluot and other toppings (I used blueberries), drizzle with syrup, and enjoy!
RELATED:  Vegan Roasted Corn Potato Soup

Notes

Leftovers & Storage: These Pluot Brown Sugar Buckwheat Pancakes are great as leftovers and can be frozen and reheated. Keep in the refrigerator for up to four days for best taste and texture, or freeze for up to a month and then reheat in the microwave or toaster.

Nutrition: The pancakes on their own are a healthier version of the classic breakfast hotcake. They are relatively low in sodium, fat, and sugar compared to traditional pancake recipes. Pair with fresh fresh and yogurt for a more balanced breakfast. The pancake nutrition information is based on the pancakes with pluots, but does not include optional toppings (including maple syrup).

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 pancake
  • Calories: 150
  • Sugar: 8g
  • Sodium: 135mg
  • Fat: 6g
  • Saturated Fat: 1g
  • Unsaturated Fat: 5g
  • Trans Fat: 0g
  • Carbohydrates: 22g
  • Fiber: 2g
  • Protein: 5g
  • Cholesterol: 35mg
Pluot Brown Sugar Buckwheat Pancakes, a healthy gluten-free take on hotcakes made with buckwheat flour, organic brown sugar, and fresh seasonal pluots. Perfect for breakfast, brunch, and everything in between! #breakfast #brunch #buckwheat #pancakes #hotcakes #pluots
Written by
Kristina Todini, RDN

Welcome! I'm a registered dietitian who believes that food should be good for you AND good for the planet. Join me in taking the "fork in the road" to eat green and live sustainably.

View all articles
Leave a reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin2K
Share4
Yum1
Tweet4
+1