Truffle Mushroom Risotto

Truffle Mushroom Risotto, a simple mushroom risotto with truffles (fresh or truffle oil!) that comes together in under 30 minutes. Italian mother-in-law approved!

a Dutch oven with mushroom and truffle risotto and a wooden spoon a white table

Love truffles and mushrooms? Love risotto? Make a mushroom and truffle risotto! This simple risotto dish featuring fresh mushrooms and either real, fresh truffles or truffle-infused oil is super simple to make and comes together in less than 30 minutes. And the best part? My Italian mother-in-law (who lives in Italy and speaks no English) approves of this tasty recipe.

👉 Ready to learn how to make risotto with truffle and mushrooms? Let’s do it!


🍄 Ingredients

  • Risotto: A short-grain Italian rice, risotto becomes soft and chewy when cooked and mimics a pasta texture. My Italian mother-in-law and husband prefer Beretta Organic Farms arborio rice.
  • Mushrooms: Any mushrooms will do, we chose button for this recipe but crimini or even shitake will work well
  • Truffles or truffle oil: An Italian delicacy, truffles are a rare type of mushroom with a very distinct flavor that are revered in the culinary world. You can use real, fresh truffles or use truffle oil (we like La Tourangelle black truffle oil).
  • Peas: Adds a pop of color and texture; we use frozen peas, but fresh peas work as well
  • Cheese or nutritional yeast (optional): For a deeper flavor, add a bit of shaved pecorino or nutritional yeast if plant-based
  • Broth: Vegetable stock is used to hydrate and cook the rice (try our homemade stock recipe made from foods scraps)
  • Oil, salt, pepper: Oil for cooking the mushrooms, salt and pepper for flavor
  • Lemon: A squeeze of fresh lemon juice adds a dash of citrus flavor to this earthy dish
  • Recommended tools: knife, small pot, large pot or Dutch oven, wide wooden spoon
mushrooms, truffles, lemon, pea, arborio rice, broth, and oil on a white table for risotto
Ingredients: mushroom, peas, truffle oil, lemon, broth, risotto rice, and more!

🥣 How to make (step-by-step photos)

1️⃣ Step One: Wash and chop mushrooms

Before you start cooking the risotto, first wash and chop the mushrooms so they’re ready to cook.

chopped mushrooms on a cutting board
Chop mushrooms

2️⃣ Step Two: Cook the mushrooms and peas

After cutting the mushrooms, heat a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat and add olive oil.

Then add in the chopped mushrooms and the peas and cook until they begin to brown and release their liquids.

👉 Flavor tip: Browning the mushrooms and peas makes for a much more flavorful risotto! The science behind it is called the maillard reaction, where the natural sugars in the vegetables create a brown color when heated and deepen their natural flavor.

cooked mushrooms and peas in a pot with a wooden spoon
Cook mushrooms and peas

3️⃣ Step Three: Bring stock to a low simmer

You’re almost ready to cook the risotto! But first, warm up the stock in a small pot on another burner on your stove by bringing it to a very low simmer.

And at this point, grab a 1/2 cup measuring cup and have it nearby because you’ll need it handy when you cook the risotto.

vegetable broth simmering in a pot on a black stove
Simmer broth

4️⃣ Step Four: Cook the risotto

It’s finally time to cook the risotto! Here’s what to do:

  1. Add risotto to pot and stir to coat with vegetables, cooking about 1 minute until rice begins to dry.
  2. Then add truffle oil to pot and allow rice to soak up the truffle flavor, about 1 minute.
  3. When rice begins to dry out again, slowly stir in 1/2 cup warm broth to rice. Continue stirring rice until well coated. The key is to soak but not over-wet rice, allowing rice to slowly absorb liquid.
  4. When rice begins to dry again, add more liquid and slowly stir. Keep stirring in small amounts of liquid and stirring rice for about 15-17 minutes.

👉 How to know when risotto is done: When the risotto is larger and beginning to get stickier, taste to ensure it is nearly al dente. The finished risotto should NOT be mushy, but have a firmness and slight crunch mouthfeel.

risotto rice, mushrooms, truffles, and peas in a large pot
Cook rice until soft

5️⃣ Step Five: Add seasonings and serve

When the rice is almost at desired doneness, add another teaspoon of truffle oil, a pinch of salt, crack of pepper, and juice of one lemon. Then stir in cheese or nutritional yeast until mixed in the risotto.

Take risotto off heat, and serve immediately with a side of lemon and a small amount of grated cheese on top.

risotto with mushrooms, peas, and truffle oil in a black bowl with a gold fork

🚫 Common risotto-making mistakes

1️⃣ Mistake #1: Not warming up stock before making risotto

Using warm broth is essential when making risotto, as the warm stock helps to cook the risotto quicker and helps to soften each rice grain so it sticks to other rice grains when stirred.

2️⃣ Mistake #2: Adding too much stock at once to risotto pot

It’s important to only add a small amount of broth to risotto at a time so that it has time to soak up the liquid and cook slowly. Adding too much broth means the rice granules are not sticking together to create the thick texture risotto is famous for.

3️⃣ Mistake #3: Not stirring risotto frequently

Stirring risotto frequently is very important to the cooking technique, as it allows the individual rice grains to have friction with the spoon – and other rice granules – and become sticky when cooked. So stir almost constantly, you’ll have very strong shoulder muscles after cooking risotto!

4️⃣ Mistake #4: Overcooking – and undercooking – risotto

There’s a delicate balance to cooking risotto, which is why it is famous for being hard to perfect. However, if you’re slowly adding broth and stirring consistently then you’ll know when risotto is done when the rice has become puffy and cooked, but not mushy. The risotto should be soft but firm, not mushy and not hard.

truffle mushroom risotto in a black bowl on a white table with a lemon

❓ Recipe questions and quick tips

What are truffles?

Truffles are a member of the mushroom family and have a strong, distinctive earthy flavor that you either love or hate. There are no ‘take them or leave them’ opinions when it comes to truffles, and their rarity is what makes them so elusive (and expensive).

There are two types of truffles on the market, black (more common, harvested throughout fall and early winter) and white (very rare, very expensive, and only available in late October through early December). Or you can skip the seasons and cheat by buying an infused truffle oil, as I did for this risotto.

What is the best kind type of risotto rice?

Risotto is an Italian short-grain rice that is used to make a creamy, almost pasta-like dish that’s famous throughout the world. The rice used in risotto is called arborio rice, which comes from Italy and is now grown in other areas of the world.


🧊 How to store

  1. Refrigerator storage: Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3-4 days. To reheat, make sure to add a bit of water to the risotto (about 1/4 cup per serving) to rehydrate the rice, in the microwave or on the stove.
  2. Freezer storage: Store in an airtight container in the freezer for up to one month. To thaw, place in the refrigerator 24 hours before reheating or place on the counter for 2 hours to thaw, then reheat in the microwave or the stove (adding water to rehydrate the rice). However, the texture of frozen and thawed risotto will be much softer than freshly cooked risotto.
a close up of mushroom truffle risotto in a black bowl before serving

🍝 More plant-forward pasta recipes

Want more pasta recipes filled with plants? We’ve got you covered:

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risotto with mushrooms, peas, and truffle oil in a black bowl with a gold fork

Truffle Mushroom Risotto

Kristina Todini, RDN
Truffle Mushroom Risotto, a simple mushroom risotto with truffles (fresh or truffle oil!) that comes together in under 30 minutes. Italian mother-in-law approved!
5 stars (4 ratings)
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Course Main Dishes
Cuisine Italian-Inspired
Servings 4 servings
Calories 293 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 1 pound mushrooms chopped
  • 8 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 cup peas fresh or frozen
  • 2 cups arborio risotto rice
  • 2 tablespoons truffle oil or 1-2 fresh truffles cooked in oil
  • 1 pinch salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice from 1 lemon
  • ¼ cup nutritional yeast or grated pecorino cheese

Instructions
 

  • Prep mushrooms: Wash mushrooms and then chop into small pieces. Set aside.
  • Cook mushrooms and peas: Add olive oil to a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add mushrooms and peas and a sprinkle of salt and pepper and cook about 5-7 minutes, or until mushrooms release their liquid and begin to brown (the browner the mushrooms, the move flavor they give to the risotto.
  • Simmer stock: While the mushrooms are cooking, bring broth to a very low simmer and have a 1/2 cup measuring cup nearby.
  • Cook risotto: Add risotto to pot and stir to coat with vegetables, cooking about 1 minute until rice begins to dry. Then add truffle oil to pot and allow rice to soak up the truffle flavor, about 1 minute. When rice begins to dry out again, slowly stir in 1/2 cup warm broth to rice. Continue stirring rice until well coated. The key is to soak but not over-wet rice, allowing rice to slowly absorb liquid. When rice begins to dry again, add more liquid and slowly stir. Keep stirring in small amounts of liquid and stirring rice for about 15-17 minutes. When rice is larger and beginning to get stickier, taste to ensure it is nearly al dente. The finished risotto should NOT be mushy, but have a firmness and slight crunch mouthfeel.
  • Add seasonings and serve: When the rice is almost at desired doneness, add another teaspoon of truffle oil, a pinch of salt, crack of pepper, and juice of one lemon. Then stir in cheese or nutritional yeast until mixed in the risotto. Take risotto off heat, and serve immediately with a side of lemon and a small amount of grated cheese on top.

Notes

  • If using fresh truffles: If using fresh, real truffles, chop them into small pieces and add 1-2 tablespoons olive oil to a pan over very low heat. Cook like you would mushrooms, adding more oil until you have the truffles suspended in oil and can use the truffle flavored oil in the risotto.
  • Leftovers and storage: Store leftovers in an airtight container and store in the refrigerator for up to three days, and the freezer for up to one month.
  • Reheat instructions: When reheating, add a small amount of water (about 1/4 cup per serving) to the risotto when reheating in either the microwave or the stovetop to rehydrate the rice.
  • Nutrition information: Nutrition information calculated with nutritional yeast and not cheese. If using nutritional yeast, this recipe is suitable for vegan diets.

Nutrition

Serving: 1servingCalories: 293kcalCarbohydrates: 42gProtein: 8gFat: 11gSaturated Fat: 2gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 8gSodium: 1918mgPotassium: 516mgFiber: 3gSugar: 6gVitamin A: 4326IUVitamin C: 9mgCalcium: 14mgIron: 3mg
Keyword mushroom risotto, truffle risotto
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

UPDATE: This recipe was originally published in March 2018 and was updated for clarity and with new photos in October 2022.

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32 Comments

    1. Well, when you add the white truffle oil and the cheese it definitely take this dish to the more indulgent end of the health spectrum…but hey, you have to indulge every once in a while!

    1. I’m glad you agree! My Italian husband approved, and he’s pretty picky about his pasta (and espresso) brands. And yes, it’s definitely flavorful! The truffle oil takes it to the next level.

  1. You gave me the courage to try risotto. I have heard the same negativity with this dish but never tried this on my own. Thanks for sharing this!

    1. I remember an Italian teacher once telling the class that it was a very difficult technique and most non-Italians never perfect it. I was scared away from trying, but honestly it’s all about patience (and shoulder muscles).

  2. Mmmmn, this classic recipe sounds amazing. I love risotto and enjoy making it. There is something calming about all that stirring that I love. I haven’t tried a risotto with truffle oil yet. I love the earthy and sweet flavor combination you have in this recipe. Buonissimo!

  3. So you totally convinced me to finally make risotto. I, too, have been totally scared to try it. But this looks so delish, it’s gotta be worth a shot!

  4. Love risotto. This comfort food makes me always hungry. I have never tried white truffle oil. On my to-try list, for sure. thanks for sharing.

    1. It’s one of my favorites! Like any time you make a recipe, it takes once or twice to get perfect but once you know the foundation for a great risotto then it will be delicious every time.

  5. Risotto is so amazing, and you’re right, it really just takes a little patience! When I have the time to spend on a side, there’s really nothing like it – and the peas and truffle oil just put it over the top! Great recipe!

  6. Mushy risotto is the WORST. I’m so glad you’ve called that out, because I’ve definitely had mushy risotto in restaurants before and when I’ve sent it back, they looked at me like I had two heads!

  7. You had me at peas and mushrooms. I really love this combination. I don’t have risotto rice, but I have another medium grain rice that I would try to substitute to make this. Delicious!

    1. Yes, definitely give the other rice a try! The thing with risotto is that it soaks up liquids well and gets sticky, which is the consistency that people love with traditional Italian risottos. And don’t forget the truffle oil! It really makes this dish. Let me know how it goes!

  8. I am so glad I found this recipe! I enjoy making risotto, but I’m new at it. My husband and daughter always complain it doesnt seem cooked all the way, which confused me because I liked the slightly firmer texture and usually get it in restaurants that way. I had no idea the PROPER way to cook it was how I was doing it all along- al dente! So now I feel more validated, haha. I have made lemon pea risotto and mushroom risotto, but never mushroom with peas, and we have some white truffle oil in the cupboard, so I’m giving it a go this week! Thanks for sharing!

    1. Hi Brittany, thanks for your review! We love risotto as well, but it’s hard to get right (lots of shoulder strength needed!). My husband is from Italy and HATES mushy pasta, so tell them it’s traditional to have the pasta be a bit firmer, or ‘al dente’. Enjoy!

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