Want to freeze leftover radishes? Follow these simple steps to cut, blanch, and freeze fresh radishes to enjoy their bright flavor and crispy texture all year round.

fresh radishes stored in a freezer bag on a white table

Did you know that radishes can be frozen? With the right preparation, you can extend the life of radishes by storing them properly, including freezing them to enjoy later. However, it's important to take a few crucial steps to prepare radishes before putting them in the freezer so you can have crispy, flavorful radishes all year long.

Radishes are a great vegetable that can be frozen for later use, however it's important to first blanch radishes to reduce their natural enzymatic ripening reactions. To do this simply cut or slice radishes, blanch then in boiling water for 2-3 minutes, cool them in an ice bath, and then dry them before sealing in an airtight container before freezing.

Ready to learn the steps to freezing fresh radishes to keep them fresh? Let's do it!


πŸ‘‰ Why you should freeze leftover radishes

If you have leftover radishes after your harvest or trip to the grocery store, here are the reasons you should freeze them for later use:

  • Extended life expectancy: When radishes are stored at room temperature, they lose freshness quicker. They last longer when frozen and maintain their taste and texture, even when frozen for months at a time.
  • Preserved flavor, texture, and color: Radishes are known for their crisp surface, zesty taste, and bright red shade. Surprisingly, freezing radishes actually preserves the texure and taste of radishes if you follow this simple blanch and freeze method.
  • Ready-made use for cooking: Since radishes are best cooked immediately after freezing, they can add a delicious touch to a meal by simply pulling them out of the freezer (no more sad leftover radishes in the back of your refrigerator!)
rainbow colored radishes on a white countertop

🧊 How to freeze radishes (step-by-step photos)

πŸ’¦ Step One: Wash radishes

First, clean radishes under cold water, making sure to scrub each radish to remove dirt and residue. Rinse the loose remnants while allowing the water to fall between your fingers.

cut radishes in a bowl filled with water
Wash radishes

πŸ”ͺ Step Two: Slice radishes

Cut the root and ends off each radish. You can then blanch and freeze radishes whole, however they may split when frozen and cause the texture to become mealy. We suggest cutting whole radishes into slices or quarters before blanching and freezing.

close up photo of sliced radishes
Slice radishes

πŸ’§ Step Three: Blanch radishes

Before freezing radishes, it's important to blanch them quickly in hot water to ensure their freshness and flavor after freezing. Blanching slows down the enzymes that cause the radishes to ripen, which means that they will stay fresh longer when frozen.

To do this bring water to a boil in a medium or large pot on high heat. Then, place the radish slice carefully to avoid splashing, and cook for 2-3 minutes.

radishes blanching in a a pot of boiling water
Blanch for 2-3 radishes

Remove your boiled sliced radishes and place them in an ice bath to slow down the cooking process.

radishes in a bowl of water with ice after blanching
Cool radishes in an ice bath

Then remove them from the cold water and lay on a towel to dry completely before freezing.

radishes drying on a kitchen towel on a white table

πŸ₯Ά Step Four: Freeze radishes

Last, place the radish slices in a freezer container or bag. Ensure your container is moisture-resistant and airtight. If you choose to use silicone or plastic zipper bags, release excessive air before sealing for the best results.

Freeze radishes

❓ Questions + quick tips

Can you freeze radishes without slicing?

Radishes can be frozen whole, however slicing radishes before freezing will ensure they are blanched evenly to prevent ripening and to preserve their texture in the freezer. The purpose of slicing radishes is to ensure that every slice freezes efficiently, providing more accessible, quicker cooking preparation.

How does boiling benefit radishes?

Boiling softens the firm texture of radishes, creating a more manageable, crisp bite. It also delay the ripening process by killing enzymes that cause radishes to become ripe and lose their crips texture and flavor.

How long do radishes last in the freezer?

Radishes can last up to two or three months using an effective storage method. They can also remain fresh longer when stored in airtight vacuum bags instead of plastic zipper bags.

radishes in a jar with water on a white table

❓ How to thaw frozen radishes

Frozen radishes should sit out for a specific period to soften. Check out this brief list of ideas for thawing radishes naturally.

  1. Submerge in cold water: Get a large mixing bowl and fill it with cold water. Place the radishes in a plastic zipper bag. Wait a few hours, and remove all radish slices from the bag.
  2. Pack safely in the refrigerator: Softening radishes in a refrigerator can keep them cold while maintaining their freshness. Although the process is slow, it’s essential when learning how to thaw radishes. It will help if you use a plate or a container to prevent melting ice from leaking onto the refrigerator surface.
  3. Thaw in the microwave using the defrost option: Microwaves can be efficient when used for defrosting. Since most microwave appliances have a specific setting intended to thaw food in a short period, cooking frozen radishes when completely defrosted is essential for preservation.

πŸ”΄ Recipes using radishes

Looking for radish recipes? We've got you covered:

How to Freeze Radishes

Want to freeze leftover radishes? Follow these simple steps to cut, blanch, and freeze fresh radishes to enjoy their bright flavor and crispy texture all year round.
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Ingredients

  • 1 bunch radishes
  • 1 small freezer friendly bag

Equipment

  • 1 sauce pan

Instructions 

  • Wash radishes. First, clean radishes under cold water, making sure to scrub each radish to remove dirt and residue. Rinse the loose remnants while allowing the water to fall between your fingers.
  • Slice radishes. Cut the root and ends off each radish. You can then blanch and freeze radishes whole, however they may split when frozen and cause the texture to become mealy. We suggest cutting whole radishes into slices or quarters before blanching and freezing.
  • Blanch radishes. Bring water to a boil in a medium or large pot on high heat. Then, place the radish slice carefully to avoid splashing, and cook for 2-3 minutes. Remove your boiled sliced radishes and place them in an ice bath to slow down the cooking process. Then remove them from the cold water and lay on a towel to dry completely before freezing.
  • Freeze radishes. Place the radish slices in a freezer container or bag. Ensure your container is moisture-resistant and airtight. If you choose to use silicone or plastic zipper bags, release excessive air before sealing for the best results.

Notes

  • Container suggestion: I suggest storing frozen radishes in an airtight freezer friendly silicon bag because you can remove excess air before closing, however you can also store in glass food storage containers.